2016 Spring Newsletter / School News

New Master of Information Studies Courses

NEW MASTER OF INFORMATION STUDIES COURSES

The Master of Information Studies (MISt) program is constantly evolving, with five new courses offered this year:

INTEGRATING RESEARCH & PRACTICE
This new MISt core course provides students with opportunities for analysis of theoretical and applied research in information studies, reflection on implications for professional practice and achievement in a capstone project summarizing students’ experiences in their studies.

SKILLS FOR INFORMATION PROFESSIONALS
Addresses four inter-related “people” or soft skills that information professionals require:  communication skills, interpersonal abilities, leadership skills and ethical and professional conduct.  Students will evaluate their current level of ability in these four areas to identify and address specific gaps. Topics include: how to present effectively, work collaboratively, lead and facilitate groups, and professional ethics.

INFORMATION ARCHITECTURE
Information Architecture (IA) is the process of analyzing, designing, implementing, and evaluating information spaces. The course provides an overview of use-design aspects of human information and computer interaction. Topics include: human factors in IA; IA and information systems (IS) design principles and methodologies; work, task, and process analysis; IS modeling, requirements gathering and evaluation; and information visualization.

MUSIC INFORMATION RETRIEVAL
Offers an overview of the foundation, terminology, and principles of Music Information Retrieval (MIR) with a focus on the users of MIR systems. The course includes an examination of recent developments and applications in MIR; a critical discussion of research methods and findings from user studies in MIR; and application to user studies in Music Information Retrieval.

INFORMATION & COGNITION
Provides an introduction to the cognitive aspects of human-information interaction. This course covers topics such as knowledge representation; tacit knowledge; decision making and problem solving; information encoding into, and retrieval from memory; information avoidance; information overload and dealing with uncertainty; how mental health issues affect information behavior; and the multimodal nature of the mind.

> Learn more about the MISt program at www.mcgill.ca/sis/programs/mist


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